Each week on “5 Minute Salute,” our host Nick Howland talks to veterans who have successfully transitioned from active duty to the business world. This week, Nick Howland sat down with Gerald Gangaram.

Gerald Gangaram strives to share the servant leader ethos he honed from the streets of NYC to the skies of Afghanistan. Sharing his life’s lessons is Gerald’s second service after his exciting military career.

To learn more, visit, https://geraldgangaram.com

Short company description: Gerald Gangaram strives to share the servant leader ethos he honed from the streets of NYC to the skies of Afghanistan. Sharing his life’s lessons is Gerald’s second service after his exciting military career. He is a U.S. Army Major and Apache helicopter pilot, who many consider a war hero from his combat service during “Operation Enduring Freedom”. Gerald is a keynote speaker armed with Combat stories, Childhood stories, Soldier stories, Cockpit stories, Diversity and Inclusion stories & many more lessons that captivate and ignite audiences. This Apache pilot’s precisely targeted message creates dynamic conversations lasting well past any Q&A.

What Branch of Service where you in and for how long?: Active duty Army for 11 years

What was your job in the military?: I was an Aviation Officer, Apache Helicopter Pilot, Commander, and Strategist.

Why do you feel it’s important for people to know your business is a Veteran Owned business?: I speak about a variety of issues, and the military is a large foundation for where my story was forged. Sharing experiences about the interactions of my Soldiers gives a depth that military personnel don’t simply serve for glory or some hero complex.

When leaving the service what was your biggest struggle?: I was medically retired after a TBI. After wearing the uniform for so long, it had become my identity, and I struggled with whether I could still be the same servant leader. I went to some really dark places that were compounded by my physical injuries, it took me a while to fight my way back.

What resources for veterans did you find that helped you overcome that struggle?: The number one resource was other service members. My interactions with those who been through similar emotional anguish allowed them to hit the right notes to keep me in the fight. The Wounded Warrior Program also had activities that allowed me to reconnect at times.

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